FEW, VERY FEW ARE THEY

A RICH man said to his servant: "Take this diamond to the market and let me know how different people price it. Take it, first of all, to the egg-plant seller." The servant took the diamond to the egg-plant seller. He examined it, turning it over in the palm of his hand, and said, "Brother, I can give nine seers of egg-plant, for it." "Friend," said the servant, "a little more say, ten seers." The eggplant seller repked: "No, I have already quoted above the market price. You may give it to me if that price suits you." The servant laughed. /font>

He went back to his master and said:    "Sir, he would give me only nine seers of egg-plants and not one more. He said he had offered more than the market price." The master smiled and said: "Now take it to the cloth dealer. The other man deals only in egg plants. What does he know about a diamond? The cloth-dealer has a little more capital. Let us see how much he offers for it." The servant went to the cloth dealer and said: "Will you buy this? How much will you pay for it?" The merchant said:    "Yes, it is a good thing.

I can make a nice ornament out of it. I will give you nine hundred rupees for it." "Brother," said the servant, "offer a little more and J will sell it to you. Give me at least a thousand rupees." The cloth-dealer said:    "Friend, don't press me more. I have offered more than the market price. I cannot give a rupee more. Suit yourself." Laughing, the servant returned to his master and said:    "He won't give a rupee more than nine hundred. He too said he had quoted above the market price." The master said with a laugh: "Now take it to a jeweller, Let us see what he has to say." The servant went to the jeweller. The jeweller glanced at the diamond and said at once, "I will give you one hundred thousand rupees for it."

One offers a price for an article according to one's capital. Can all comprehend the Indivisible Satchidananda? Only twelve rishis could recognize Ramachandra. All cannot recognise an Incarnation of God. Some take him for an ordinary man, some for a holy person, and only a few recognise him as an Incarnation. (134)